Is the Internet a big Trap?

– can it be the internet is a deadly trap comparable to a Dyson sphere?

When I was much younger I got into contact with two science fiction novels that were variations of a famous idea of the not less famous physicist Freeman Dyson. The first was Larry Nivens Ringworld, a story about a ring of 150 million kilometres radius around a star, where a space ship from earth lands and the crew experiences a lot of adventures when traveling alongside the tangential direction on the inner, star facing side of the big ribbon or band. The other story was not as half as entertaining but much more philosophical: it was Bob Shaws Orbitsville. Here the crew of a space ship from earth enters a sphere around a star with 150 million kilometres radius. The area of the inner sphere is 500 million times bigger than the area of planet earth. It seems to be the solution for the problem of overpopulation on Earth and any other inhabited planet of the galaxy as well. And it seems to be the ultimate paradise of nature with it’s giant, practically endless landscapes, built by a mystic, ancient civilization. The sphere of the story has only one entrance: a tiny hole on one side, where spaceships can fly into it.

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A cut-open hypothetical Dyson Sphere in our solar system, 500 million times the area of planet earth to settle, a paradise? Fig.: Wikipedia

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The 10 most dangerous Technologies ever

Who’d have thunk it?

Yesterday I started reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury again. I read it for the first time about 25 years ago, around 1988. The book was published first in 1954 in Great Britain by Rupert Hart-Davis, Ltd. Ray Bradbury is an American Citizen but he found an English publisher for the book. I don’t know if this has something to do with the political circumstances of the USA of the 1950th, but some philosophic writers got problems in this political period and the novel is very sociocritical. It’s an utopian novel, virtually a dystopian story, that tries to show us, that if we loose our books, we loose everything. Why? Because if we loose our books, we loose our history and so the essences of the complete lives of all our predecessors. I was thinking if there are today technologies that are able to completely annihilate mankind and human history, more than the firemen in Bradbury’s novel and their programmable assassin robots can do.

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